Anetha, UFO95 & Orgaphine uncover mutant forms of slippery sexuality in Wet For It

Casting their gaze over a menagerie of cybernetic, biomechanical and chimeric creatures, producers Anetha & UFO95 and CGI artist duo Orgaphine build a world in which fetish and phobia blur into one another.

‘Wet For It’ is the second collaborative track from producer, DJ and Mama Told Ya label head Anetha and rising talent UFO95, aka Killian Vaissade, a lethal, headlong charge through subterranean technoid textures, death drive synthesis and IDM inflected alien choruses, drawing influences from the duo’s shared love of hardcore techno, contemporary reggaeton and experimental sound design. “Killian is one of the most talented and proactive producers of his generation,” says Anetha. “I love his work and his universe.” Appearing on his second album, Use your difference to make the difference, ‘Wet For It’ is a thrilling glimpse of a new live project from the two artists, serving as an introduction to their collaborative sound. “With this new album I wanted to go further in my music making process, to not fix boundaries,” explains UFO95. Finding inspiration in ’90s IDM, specifically Richard D. James’s releases as Polygon Window, UFO95 worked to incorporate these sounds into Use your difference to make the difference. To match the dark ecstasy of the music, Anetha and UFO95 enlisted the talents of another creative duo, Orgaphine, the collaborative project of CGI artists Salika Kadita and Computer.kitty, to build a suitable world for ‘Wet For It’ to live inside of. The result is an ecosystem that surges between psychosexual manifestation and body horror mutation, in which fetishes and phobias blur into each other.

Following a twisted menagerie of cybernetic, biomechanical and chimeric creatures, Orgaphine explore their own sexual identities and bodies through various environments and avatars: shallow-breathing horse babies illuminated by floodlight, visions of an entropic, hermaphroditic fertility goddess, nests of umbilical cords and fallopian tubes. “The narrative is centered around Agena, who is the bird-like being with horse legs,” explain Orgaphine. “Agena moves around in this universe and connects with the horses through hoses and creates symbiotic, mutually benefitting relations. Agena is there to nurture the horses.” This central figure appears throughout the world of Wet For It, running figurative and literal lines through and from its different figures and scenes. Both nurturing mother and bound abomination, Agena’s erratic movement traces the strange momentum of Anetha and UFO95’s sound. “We tried to create a sexual space we can bring multiple sides of ourselves into and challenge a dominating stand on these topics; internalised ideas of our own bodies and sexuality,” Orgaphine explain. “Though we introduce sensitive topics, especially in the context of sexuality, like fear of umbilical cords, hyperventilation, dysphoria and the visual language itself, we wanted to tell a story where we can explore such things not for the sake of phobia, but to be recognized and included.”

“It does speak to some darkness, but we feel like, seen purely, it’s simply what’s going down in their world and they are having the best time,” they conclude. In the virtual worlds of Wet For It, sites of horror are reproduced as erotic zones, low-lit, Twin Peaks-esque nocturnal woodlands become a space for exploration, breath play reconfigured as a characteristic of the defenceless and viscera slick horse baby. A industrial cavern and rain-lashed canyon house strange bio-mechanical golems processing in solemn strides, dysphoric forms obscured by metallic face filters suspended from metallic exoskeletons, technologically mediated reproductions of their own likenesses constructed as ceaseless voyeuristic avatars, consigned to a trudging search. In the visual’s climactic moments, ivory white horses, born of fallopian nests swollen with eggs, are butterfly pinned to the concrete of a warehouse floor, the flailing dance of Agena channelled into a mutant ritual of care performed by an ersatz mother.

You can find Anetha, UFO95 and Orgaphine on Instagram. ‘Wet For It’, taken from Use your difference to make the difference, is out now.

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